Interest in Biodiesel Grows in New Jersey

Nov. 4 meeting in northern New Jersey to help potential home-brewers/users.

Interest in home-brewing biodiesel from waste vegetable oils is still rising fast throughout the Northeast. With diesel fuel and heating oil prices still high, farmers and homeowners are getting serious about making the fuel from waste vegetable oils for trucks, autos, plus home and greenhouse heat.

That's why the Foodshed Alliance and New Jersey's Organic Farmers Association are sponsoring an afternoon workshop on Nov. 4 near Ross's Corner, N.J. to show how biodiesel is made and how diesel engines can be converted to run on the fuel. At Noon that day, a biodiesel/WVO car meet is planned at the Chatterbox Restaurant.

The program starts at 1 p.m. at Ideal Farms, just a short drive from the restaurant. Ben Jorritsma of Ideal Farms will demonstrate how he processes waste vegetable oil from Chatterbox Restaurant for use in tractors and trucks.

Then it switches to a demonstration by Fossil Free Fuel of using a custom converter kits for diesel cars, trucks, rvs and semis. And, homeowner Dean Rikard will explain how he heats his home and his auto with WVO.

The northern New Jersey site is easy to get to from northeastern Pennsylvania and eastern New York state. The Chatterbox Restaurant is located at the Ross's Corner intersection of U.S. 206 and state route 15, five miles north of Newton, N.J. To get to Ideal Farms, follow 15 south and make the next right, before a large red Morton Building.

To register, contact the Foodshed Alliance at (908) 362-7967. For more information, visit the Web site: www.foodshedalliance.org.  

October's American Agriculturist cover story featured Giff Foster, a New York farmer, who puts his cost of producing biodiesel at close to 50 cents a gallon. You'll find another interview with him elsewhere on this Web site. Just plug in the word "biodiesel" on the site's search window.

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