Boumatic rolls out America’s newest robotic milking system

Company is bringing on its new robotic milker. Here’s what’s in that box, plus need-to-know robotic tech details.

Boumatic’s double-box robotic milking module made its long-awaited New York Farm Show debut — direct-shipped from California’s World Ag Expo. In simple terms, this self-contained system is a slide-in, plug-in and call-the-cows-in unit that sends milk to the cooler from 100 to 110 cows per day, reported Paul Brzuszkiewicz, Boumatic district sales manager.

The MR-D1 model joins DeLaval, GEA, Insentec and Lely brands in the U.S. robotic milking system market — with a distinctly different design. The double-box system is designed for two cows to enter from opposite sides, then be milked simultaneously from the rear by a single robotic arm. That, according to Boumatic, will significantly reduce the overall cost of milk production.

Unlike the side approach of competitive robots, this hydraulically-powered arm works both milking stalls from behind. It completes the entire milking process — teat washing, drying, premilking and milking — from the enclosed technical area. Post-dipping is handled by a separate pop-up sprayer treatment.

Stalls in the working display model weren’t covered. But web and product information brochures show them covered, minimizing bird entry and dust.

Click for a closer look at the MR-D1.

Need-to-know tech details
Regardless of the brand, robotic systems are high-maintenance milkers, guaranteed to help next-gen dairy techies earn their keep. While robotic arms are built to last, Brzuszkiewicz acknowledged that invading dust and other barn materials require continual cleaning.

Hoses that move milk get hard, heavy use. Computer software for running the systems and monitoring cow data in these systems demand continual upgrading. And interpreting extensive data to boost cow output is a skill of its own.

TAGS: Livestock
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